Music Therapy For Disabled Individuals

Music has a beautiful power to move us, uplift our moods, motivate us, and connect us with our friends and family. It helps us to communicate and express our feelings, and to understand the world and people around us with a new level of depth. Songs and rhythms not only entertain and delight us; there is scientific evidence that certain beats can increase mental wellness, reduce pain, and even improve our sleep.

With all of this considered, it is only natural that music can also be a form of formal therapy. Music can help to facilitate a connection between a patient and their therapist, helping them to create a goal-oriented treatment plan. Music therapy is patient-centered, and every session is unique and tailored to the patient’s needs.

Several major studies have suggested music can be good for one’s health. The research has shown that listening to music or playing instruments can help heal both physical and mental conditions.

In the United States, there are more than 6,000 trained music therapists. Many of them work with people with special needs to help improve communication skills and social connections.

In passive music therapy, you will listen to calming music and be invited to visualize peaceful images, while active music therapy sessions will have you working with your therapist to play and improvise music. During an active music therapy appointment, you might listen to music, play an instrument, practice singing, write a song, or even dance.

People have embraced music’s therapeutic powers throughout history. In World War II, doctors and nurses noted the remarkably positive effect that music played by volunteers had on the wellbeing of wounded soldiers in army hospitals. It was so effective that, by the time the War ended, some doctors were paying musicians to play to their patients.

Here are 5 benefits of Music Therapy for people with special needs:

  1. Music is a great motivator and adds positivity to the lives of disabled individuals
  2. Music is a multisensory experience unmatched to none and it can evoke a lot of sensors and emotions at the same time which can help the disabled improve their physical and/or mental well-being.
  3. Music is Processed in Both Hemispheres of the Brain and the remarkable thing about music is that it’s processed in many regions of the brain simultaneously. The Cognitive Neuroscience of Music shows that when making music, the sensory cortex, auditory cortex, hippocampus, visual cortex, cerebellum, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and motor cortex are all firing at once.
  4. When making music with a disabled individual who can’t speak, you can connect with each other and express yourself with words.
  5. Music helps people bond and create meaningful relationships. It can significantly improve the quality of life for the disabled and give them a sense of hope and purpose.

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Music Therapy For Disabled Individuals

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